Revolution is coming to a country near you

Written by Ciaran Ryan. Posted in Journalism

Vancouver Riot 2011 - VIII by cabbit

Vancouver Riot 2011
– VIII from cabbit
Flickr.com

 

What do Syria, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco and Algeria all have in common?

Apart from violent street protests or outright revolution, they are the world’s most profligate printers of money.

The Johannesburg-based and Austrian-leaning economic research house ETM Analytics recently put out some research that looks at the economic triggers behind social upheaval. Rather than looking at the more obvious political causes of violent revolution, the research shows that those countries with the money printing presses in overdrive are also those experiencing – or about to experience – massive social tension.

Take a look at the accompanying graph and make your own deductions. It’s no surprise that Syria tops the list, with a Continuous Commodity Index (CCI) inflation rate of 60% since the start of 2010. Next comes Turkey, Brazil, South Africa and Argentina with CCI inflation of 30-40% over the same period.

It’s true that apart from Syria, none of these countries have experienced anything like the kind of upheaval in Egypt, Tunisia and Syria. Not yet, at any rate.

Continues at source

 

Blood diamond farce

Written by Ciaran Ryan. Posted in Journalism

Kimberley Diamond Mine by The National Archives UK

Kimberly diamond mine
Source: Creative Commons

Something from the archive (2010) when Kieron was up in Congo…

Naomi Campbell is in the ridiculous position of having to give testimony at the war crimes trial of former Liberian warlord Charles Taylor on the grounds that she received a blood diamond from him. One might question the company she keeps, but on the diamond issue she should tell her inquisitors to go to hell.

Blood Diamond was a fun movie and no doubt had elements of truth to it. Leonardo di Caprio’s South Africa accent was passable (actually he portrayed an ex-Rhodesian who had moved onto bigger, badder battles fighting the white African cause wherever that calling took him). His real crime was attempting to smuggle diamonds supposedly obtained by slave labour and destined for the grand arms bazaar that turned countries like Sierra Leone and Liberia into giant, open-air slaughter houses. A somewhat embarrassing sub-text to this story is that it was a company of South African mercenaries, called Executive Outcomes, that brought peace to Sierra Leone in the 1990s, allowing 300,000 refugees to return home safely before the World Bank forced the bankrupt government of the time to terminate its contract with the company. The result? Aluta continua (“the struggle goes on”) as they used to say in Mozambique, as the warlords recaptured lost ground and the blood diamond trade flourished once more. If there were no diamonds in Sierra Leone, the warlords would have traded cassava, cows or rhino horn.

Continues at source:

www.lewrockwell.com/orig11/ryan-k1.1.1.html

 

Ghana leads business boom

Written by Ciaran Ryan. Posted in Journalism

Accra, Ghana by littledutchboy

Photo: Creative Commons

South Africans are pouring into Ghana, the world’s fastest-growing economy, with a growth rate of 14.4% last year.

Stroll through any town in Ghana and it is impossible to miss the South African presence. There are Engen garages, Stanbic branches and ATMs in all the major towns and MTN signs are as ubiquitous as Coca-Cola. The 21,000m2 Accra Mall, recently sold by private equity group Actis to the Pretoria-based Atterbury Property Group for $65-million (for an 85% share), would not look out of place in Centurion or Sandton. Three of the biggest tenants in the mall are Game, Mr Price and a Shoprite that stocks a range of South African products at prices that would not seem out of place in some of the more expensive European capitals.